Matt Badiali: Natural Resources Expert

Matt Badiali deals in natural resources such as fossil fuel derived oil or natural gas. He is an expert on the mining, energy and agricultural industries, because he is having worked on oil rigs, owned oil wells, and explored abandoned mines. He has been to Papua New Guinea, Iraq, Hong Kong, Singapore, Haiti, Turkey, Switzerland and many other locations, helping to scout for natural resources that can make a profit. He is capable of analyzing geological data which helps him determine sources, as he is the sort of person who needs to see things for himself so he can draw his own scientific conclusion. Follow Matt Badiali at stocktwits.com

As a geologist with extensive training, Matt can spot red flags that can be seen on the ground. Matt knows how to combine his geology knowledge with his work as an investor. He meets with many a mining CEO to hear about the latest technological findings. He knows how to track down profit for his readers. He applies his natural resources data to the investment world. Matt has a B.S. in earth sciences from Penn State University and a Masters in Geology from Florida Atlantic University. Coal was once the main source of fuel used and then natural gas became prominent. More info at Talk Markets.

All natural gas releases is two molecules of water and one molecule of carbon dioxide when it is burned. Coal was once the main source of fuel since it was cheap and able to be moved around easily. In the 1990s, there was a shale revolution in the United States which displaced coal, making natural gas all the rage. Gas turbines can make for instant fuel resources. When demand increased for natural gas, so did supply, Matt Badiali writes for Medium.com. The price went down from $14 per thousand cubic feet (MCF) in 2008 to $1.65 per MCF in March 2016.

Natural gas is produced but goes into storage the whole summer and each winter the supply is used for electrical power generation. 2014 was notable for the natural gas reduction in natural gas featuring lower prices for this precious natural resource that can generate electricity. Matt often keeps track of oil prices in his work, and prior to joining Banyan Hill, Matt was a geologist for a drilling company, as well as a consultant to an environmental company. Matt is a very hands-on sort of scientist and investor since he talks to everybody, which is his way.

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